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CN8WW im CQWWDX 1999 05.04.2004
cn8ww_qsl_99 Lange haben viele BCC-Mitglieder und Freunde daraufhin gearbeitet: CN8WW als Mulit/Multi-Operation im CQWW in SSB und CW. Und es hat sich gelohnt: In beiden Teilen konnten neue Weltrekorde aufgestellt werden.

CN8WW - The Bavarian Contest Club in Morocco!

Many of you may have worked CN8WW in the last CQWWDX-contests in 1999 in SSB or CW, but what is the story behind this operation?

After winning the European records in the multi-multi-category as LX7A in 1989, it was time to try the world record as the solar cycle should be at its maximum around the year 2000. The place to go had definitely to be in North Africa. CT3 and EA9 were considered, but finally the discussions came to an end, when Ben, DL6FBL, told us about his CQWW 1998 experiences from Morocco! In September 1999 DL6FBL and DL8WPX went to Morocco for the WAEDC SSB contest to check out the location, do the final negotiations, and settle open questions. After their return to Germany the work began: With the help of an Internet Website and an Email reflector, all participants knew the plans and always had the latest news about the project.

16 operators were found to join the SSB part. They were flying to Morocco 10 days before the contest. Three of them made the trip on the road to bring the equipment to CN8! It took 50 hours of driving, but they safely arrived in Rabat, the capital city of the Kingdom of Morocco.

Now it was time to set up all antennas and the stations. The plan was to have verticals for the low bands close to the waterfront and Yagis for the high bands up on the hill about 60m above the sea. The lowband shack was located in the hotel directly at the beach, the highband shack was in a container up on a hill connected via 250m of a really thick powerline cable and Ethernet cabling.

The ambitious work of installing a four square for 40m and 80m at the beach was very badly wiped off as the atlantic ocean showed us how rude it could be! The verticals came down and some ropes were lost to the ocean - maybe they were found later by the PJ4B boys... After that 80m only had one single vertical and 40m only had the two beams.

All radios were Kenwood TS850's, because this is the most popular radio among the BCC-members. In case of a failure we could easily swap radios. We used a lot of filters to avoid interferences between the bands, homebrew ones as well as commercial ones. All stations were connected by an Ethernet link. DX spots came in over an Internet dial-up link to a local provider.

The antenna setup:
  
160m: inv L and dipole
   80m: vertical, dipole
   40m: two Cushcraft 2ele-Yagis, plus a 2ele vertical array for CW part
   20m: three Cushcraft Yagis (4 and 5 ele)
   15m: three Cushcraft Yagis (4 and 5 ele)
   10m: three Cushcraft Yagis (4 and 5 ele)

Four optimized Beverage antennas for different directions up to 250m long did a tremendous job in lowband reception. After the CW contest we received many Emails like: "Wow! You heard my 5 watts signal from New Mexico on 160m!"

We had rented three 24 m high Towers from a local company, thus we did not have to transport them. Every band (10, 15, 20m) had three Cushcraft Monoband Yagis, of which the lowest one was fixed to Europe, the middle one fixed to the U.S. and the highest one rotatable. With the help of WX0B Stackmatches all antenna combinations were available in the shack.

Now the contest was about to start and a paper that planned unbelievable 70 million points showed up on the wall. What no one had expected: after a few hours we were above the plan and finally claimed 76 million points! The old record (PJ1B 1990) was 57,6 million! But how did the others do? We heard IG9A claiming 70 million and PJ4B claiming 65 million points. It was fantastic, we really did it!

The following night was very short, and on Monday we already began to put down antennas and to store the equipment that stayed in Morocco until the CW part.

One week before the CW part the 12 operators arrived at the hotel to try the same in CW. And this was an even bigger success: CN8WW managed to almost double the old M/M-record, which was set by 6Y2A with 39 million points in 1998. There was a claimed score of 74 million at the end. This contains more than 4300 QSOs, 40 zones and 160 countries on each band from 10-20m, another 4400 QSOs, 40 zones and 140 countries on 40m, and unbelievable 3300 and 1700 QSOs on 80m and 160m respectively.

Please visit
http://www.dl6fbl.de/cn8ww/ for further information.

Final results:

CQWWDX-SSB (claimed):

BAND QSO PTS P/Q Zones CTYS OPs
--------------------------------------------------------
160 1049  3118 2.97 19  84 DL8WPX
 80 2249  6703 2.98 25 117 DL6RAI, DL8OH
 40 2755  8199 2.98 35 141 DK6WL, DK2OY, DL4MCF
 20 5986 17841 2.98 40 186 OE2VEL, OE2MON, OE2LCM
 15 5022 14975 2.98 40 180 DK7YY, DL2NBU, DK5WL
 10 6163 18391 2.98 40 192 DL1MFL, DL6FBL
--------------------------------------------------------
All 23224 69227 2.98 199 900 => 76,080,473

technical support: DJ5IW, DL9NEI


CQWWDX-CW (claimed):

BAND QSO PTS P/Q Zones CTYS OPs
--------------------------------------------------------
160 1720  5139 2.99 23  99 DL8WPX
 80 3298  9864 2.99 36 123 DK2OY, DK8LV
 40 4420 13220 2.99 40 141 DL3DXX, DL3NCI
 20 4898 14643 2.99 40 160 DL2MEH, S51TA, DJ2QV
 15 4383 13088 2.99 40 160 DK9IP, DK1BT
 10 4650 13892 2.99 40 161 DL6FBL, DL6LAU
--------------------------------------------------------
All 23369 69846 2.99 219 844 => 74,246,298

 




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