The BCC logo
BCC - The Bavarian-Contest-Club


BCC Wandkalender 2017
Home 
ber uns 
Kalender 
Historie 
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2000-2009
CN8WW
1990-1999
1983-1989
1989
1988
1987
1986
1985
1984
1983
Contest 
Contest-FAQ 
Projekte 
Testberichte 
Internes 
Mitglieder 
Galerien 
WABCC 

WRTC 2018

Google
Web BCC


CQWWDX: LX7A Multi/Multi ... breaking the OH0W Record 28.02.2009
LX7A SSB-QSL October 29-30, 1989 -- November 25-26, 1989

What's LX7A?

It is hard to say it all on a few pages. I think one could write a book about what happened to the 40 hams and the tons of equipment, who went to Luxembourg to reach out for a new European record in the CQ World Wide DX Contest - something we had missed only by a few points the year before.

Service National de la Jeunesse provided us with an ideal location for such an enterprise: A lost restaurant building in the middle of a national wildlife park with almost infinite space for antennas, a big kitchen, warm showers and adequate sleeping facilities for 40 people. It was the place where had been the year before.

The Administration des Postes et Tlcommunications of Luxembourg had again generously issued a special call for us, absolutely unique and a new prefix for everyone.

This activity was not commercially sponsored but rather a "beg, borrow and steal" affair. The gear came from about 85 different shacks and radio clubs.

Putting it up

Within 5 days the station was put together. Most antennas were taken down after the Phone weekend and stored for the CW portion of the contest. Here's a diary of the station installation.

Saturday, October 21st:
The truck started in northern Bavaria at 12:00 local time.

Sunday, October 22nd:
After a dozen stops we headed for Luxemburg on Sunday evening.

Monday, October 23rd:
We hit the QTH at 02:30 local time. After a short night the five of us got up and started unloading the truck and assembling the first antennas. We errected the tower for the 40m beam, the tower for the 15m antenna and the biggest of all, the supporting pole for the 160m sloper system, which was about 35 meters high.

Tuesday, October 24th:
We assembled and installed the 2 el phased quarter wave vertical array for 80m, the 15m main antenna (a 5 el Yagi) and a dipole for 80m. We also put up the 3 el half wave sloper system for 160m. Then we began assembling the Beverage system which consisted of 10 wires each 250m long.

Wednesday, October 25th:
We assembled and installed the 2 el 40m Yagi, the 6 over 6 for 10m, the 20m main antenna (a 204BA) and the second antenna for 10m (3 el Yagi). We finished the Beverage system and fixed various problems with the control circuitry.

Thursday, October 26th:
We assembled and installed the auxiliary antenna for 20m (another 204BA), constructed and installed an auxiliary 15m antenna, strung two diploes (for 40m and 160m). The multiplier QTH's antenna system (3 rotary beams, 4 verticals, a dipole and a 40m delta loop) was errected.

Friday, October 27th:
7 independent VHF/UHF links to the multiplier QTH were installed. We set up the six receiving stations at the multiplier QTH and six operating positions at the main QTH. 12 hours before the contest almost everything was ready. At 18:00z we had a ``Full Power'' test.

Saturday & Sunday, October 28th and 29th:
Contest

Monday, October 30th:
We took down everything except the 10m 6 over 6 and the 160m sloper system, which remained for the CW portion of the contest. Amazing, how dismantling the station goes so much faster than putting it together ...

The Contest

There is not much to say about this. You've been in this contest yourself and worked us on a number of bands (this is why you get this letter, kind of an award, hi) so you know how it was (in case you forgot: it was {f fantastic}!). We claim a new multiplier record for both SSB (926) and CW (901). Nobody else in the world has ever had multiplier numbers that high. We managed 5BDXCC in 48 hours on CW and just missed it on SSB (with 93 countries on 80m). We worked 197 total different countries on SSB and 169 on CW.

Who's who in LX7A?

The LX7A gang consisted of 58 hard boiled contesters from Germany, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Switzerland and the USA. The activity was organized by the Bavarian Contest Club. Here is a short characterization of each of our OPs:

  • DA1DW, Daniel (33) [SSB 10m]: Said he couldn't search multipliers - so he had to run the pile ups.
  • DA1KM, Bob (29) [SSB 15m]: Liked the beer.
  • DF2UU, Hans (29) [SSB 40m]: The most hectic phone OP.
  • DF3CB, Bernd (27) [SSB 160m, CW 160m]: ``An antenna will only work if you believe in it.'' 
  • DF4SA, Conny (17) [CW 20m]: The youngest blood. 
  • DF6RI, Alfred (41) [CW 15m]: The dedicated nighttime OP on 15m.
  • DF7RX, Bernhard (33): The organizer, who brought them all together. 
  • DF9LJ, Little Joe (27) [CW 80m]: A critical observer of the 80m antenna and one of the DLCS gang. 
  • DJIP, Rick (41) [CW 40m, SSB 40m]: Contesting without Rick is only half the fun.
  • DJ1AT, Hartmut (52): He jumped in anywhere.
  • DJ2BW, Herman (55) [CW 40m]: He not only loves 40m, he lives on this band. 
  • DJ2EH, Dieter (43) [CW 80m]: Designed network and control logic for the 4 el 80m phased array.
  • DJ3TF, Wolfgang (37) [CW 160m]: Also loves 40 but had to QSY to 160. 
  • DJ5PA, Frank (52) [CW 10m]: Brought the DLAA expierience to LX7A.
  • DK1FW, Wolf (41) [SSB 15m]: The workhorse; can run pile ups for 40 out of 48 hours. 
  • DK2GZ, Harry (28) [CW 40m]: The quiet CW-only OP who knows 40m in and out.
  • DK2OY, Manfred (40) [SSB 15m, CW 40m]: Big bear - one of the DLCS gang. 
  • DK2ZO, Wolfgang (39) [CW 20m]: We hired him two days before the contest weekend.
  • DK3GI, Roland (39) [SSB 20m]: Our contest coach. 
  • DK5PD, Lothar (38) [CW 15m]: Weak signal enthusiast. Member of the famous DKBN gang. 
  • DK5WL, Joe (33) [SSB 40m, CW 40m]: Cigarillo smoker - helped to keep the flies out of the shack.
  • DK6WL, Helmut (31) [SSB 40m]: Compensates less power with loud voice. Loves fourty. 
  • DK7PE, Rudi (32) [CW 160m]: The top band expert.
  • DK8FD, Alex (22) [CW 10m]: Forgot to note down zone numbers for the first 8 hours of the contest. 
  • DK8MZ, Wolfgang (32) [SSB 10m]: His high pitched voice breaks every pile up. 
  • DK9IP, Winnie (29) [SSB 20m, CW 20m]: The coolest OP we had.
  • DL1HCM, Mike (29) [CW 20m]: Hardly ever slept - made 1000 QSOs before the contest.
  • DL1LAA, Lutz (28) [SSB 20m]: Tower climbing talent. One of the DLCS gang. 
  • DL1SBR, Frank (20) [SSB 10m, CW 20m]: An expert in high voltage power supplies.
  • DL1VJ, Bernd (27) [CW 15m]: Can work hard under bad weather conditions - UG6 expierence.
  • DL2HBX, Uli (24) [CW 20m]: Said, he has never seen so many crazy contesters in one place.
  • DL2NBU, Peter (24) [CW 80m]: Technical magician.
  • DL3LAB, Wolfgang (35) [SSB 80m]: High quality craftsman. One of the DLCS gang.
  • DL3NCI, Markus (19) [CW 40m]: Another 40m wizard.
  • DL4MCF, Thomas (25) [SSB 20m]: A hard worker with good ears.
  • DL4MEH, Andreas (29) [SSB 15m]: A real truobleshooter; found all the bugs in the station.
  • DL4NAC, Martin (22) [CW 40m]: manager of LX8A in 1988.
  • DL4RDU, Dietmar (35): The photographer.
  • DL5IC, Hans-Jrgen (29) [SSB 20m]: Brought the most expensive radio - and we killed it!
  • DL5MAE, Wolfgang (27) [SSB 160m, CW 80m]: The EME freak with a heart for the low bands.
  • DL5RDO, Dieter (18) [CW 10m]: The dedicated nighttime OP on 10m. 
  • DL6FBL, Ben (22) [SSB 10m, CW 10m]: The guy who likes to take showers during 10m JA openings.
  • DL6NCY, Stefan (18) [SSB 10m]: Our resident electrician. 
  • DL6RAI, Ben (26) [SSB 80m, CW 15m]: Deputy organizer and multiplier control software author.
  • DL6WT, Hans-Jrgen (45): DK5PD's brother, another GHz expert of DKBN fame.
  • DL7AV, Thomas (46) [SSB 15m, CW 80m]: The technical genius: He fixed the Beverages.
  • DL7MAT, Albert (59): Peeled about 100 pounds of potatoes.
  • DL8NBJ, Fred (36): Our ``trucker''.
  • DL8OH, Dieter (45) [SSB 40m]: The HBCZS organizer in 1988; got quiet since married.
  • DL9RDL, Dagmar (33) [SSB 80m, CW 80m]: Our secret weapon on 80m during the daytime. With her sweet voice she pulled in the casual contesters.
  • HB9DFD, Michael (34) [SSB 160m]: Critical observer of the modulation level on the 160m station.
  • LX1II, Liette (28): She was chef in the kitchen the week before the contest.
  • LX1MK, Ray (42): He was the chef for the Contest weekend.
  • LX1RQ, Robert (31): Kept track of the multiplier list for 40 hours in a row - then slept for 20 hours.
  • LX1WW, Claude (25) [CW 80m]: Public relations manager and camera man.
  • PA3CEF, Thomas (27) [SSB 20m]: Flying Dutchman flew away on 20m. One of the PA6DX gang.
  • PA3DWD, Bert (30) [SSB 80m]: Speaking Dutch on 80m gave us a lot of PA-QSOs. Another PA6DXer.
  • SWL, Angela (25): A blessing for the kitchen.

LX7A Soapbox

  • The SSB portion of the contest was so boring that the 160 m OPs fell asleep. Not even a single stateside contact on phone.

  • LX7A attracted much attention by local newspapers. Radio Luxembourg was here with a camera team. When we passed the border back to Germany, even the customs had heard of the operation.

  • The heavy stuff, (like crank-up towers, power supplies etc.) was transported on a 7.5 ton truck which was already over the weight limit when only half of the stuff was loaded. Fortunately, nobody asked ...

  • Every morning, Vietnam veteran DJ0IP, woke the crew up at half past six using a sirene and a megaphone. One of his wake-up mottos was: ''Get out of your beds - the Russians have already put up three antennas this morning!'' Rick was really the most hated person in the team - he loved it.

  • As usual, most of our antennas had never been used before. They were tested at LX7A for the first time. One of the two 15 meter antennas for example was constructed on-site. Two days before the contest we had realized that there was no second 15m antenna left. Luckily we had enough spare aluminum tubing to build a home brew 4 el Yagi, with the help of W6SAI's ``Beam Antenna Handbook''.

  • Twenty meters held the record for being the technically most advanced station. Their operating position was about 5 by 4 meters. There was so much equipment that some people thought it was an exhibition.

  • Radio Luxembourg produced 50 Volts EMF on the ``low noise'' Beverage antennas!

  • Every band had at least two antennas. The 15m phone crew was so confused that they rotated the wrong antenna for the first 12 hours of the contest in the main QTH. And in the multiplier QTH on the 15m antenna rotator, North was North and South was South but East was West (two crossed wires on the rotor control box).

  • The 10m phone station was set up in an unused aquarium to be as close as possible to the antennas.

  • Two hours before the contest started, the 20-m phone crew killed our most expensive transceiver, an IC-765 - a pin-diode was broken. Fortunately we had a 1N4007, which served well for the rest of the time. (I think it is still in this radio)

  • On Sunday afternoon, the 10m CW-OPs started argueing over a PY2. One claimed that the call of the station just worked ended in ``Alpha'' while the other insisted on ``Delta''. This went so far that one of the two OPs even wanted to go home. Finally they found out that they had listened to two different stations.

  • There was that JA-station who sent his QSL in an envelope which had been used before (it originally came from LA8-land). The good guy had somehow managed to turn the outer of the envelope inside so that it could be used again. That is really what you call recycling!

  • The QSL manager remarks that the green stamps from JA are always bright and shiny while those received from the US are old and dirty. Wonder why this is so ...?

  • Over the years we have expierienced that you can never have enough tools along on an expedition. Some of the more unusual parts included a welding machine, a flex, a nice assortment of drilling machines, an oscilloscope and about 150 different screwdrivers. What must we bring next time? A spectrum analyzer, a concrete mixer and a big hammer.

  • Double female PL-259 connectors have now been classified as ``consumer goods''. Before the expedition we bought 50, afterwards only 5 were found. Where did they go? (Are we running too much power?)

  • Every time you go on an expedition involving so much material you seem to loose some things. On the other hand, when you're back home and look into the toolbox there are other things which you never have seen before. But most astonishing is the growing amount of material which apparently belongs to nobody.

LX7A still holding the "European Record SSB" in the CQWWDX Contest Multi/Multi-class since 1989

The next sunspot-cycle isn't far away ... we will see if the record survive ... ???

Band
QSOs
Points
Zones
Countries
160m
655
671
7
57
80m
1884
2416
18
93
40m
2409
3885
34
121
20m
3190
6566
40
166
15m
3190
7266
39
157
10m
3272
7899
37
157
Total
14947
28703
175
751

Final Score: 26.578.978 Points

LX7A still holding the "European Record CW" in the CQWWDX Contest Multi/Multi-class since 1989

The next sunspot-cycle isn't far away ... we will see if the record survive ... ???

Band
QSOs
Points
Zones
Countries
160m
850
952
16
66
80m
1884
2839
26
102
40m
2567
4576
36
125
20m
3158
6375
37
148
15m
2766
6014
39
134
10m
2369
5569
37
135
Total
13594
26325
191
710

Final Score: 23.718.825 Points


Artikel mit Diashow!  LX7A 1989




Impressum   Seitenanfang
Webmaster: Werner Maier, DL4NER 
Content Management System: fCMS v4.11 by fidion